LATICE 2016

Fourth International Conference on Learning and Teaching in Computing and Engineering
Mumbai, India, March 31st - April 3rd, 2016

Keynote Speakers

Link to the keynote presentation

Abstract:
Computing education is in enormous demand. Many students (both children and adult) are realizing that they will need programming in the future. I argue that they are not all going to use programming in the same way and for the same purposes. What do we mean when we talk about teaching everyone to program? Should we have the same goals as computer science education for professional software developers? How do we design computing education that works for everyone? I propose the use of a learner-centered design approach to create computing education for a broad audience. I review the history of the idea that programming isn’t just for the professional software developer, and present case studies to explore the idea that computer science for everyone requires us to re-think how we teach and what we teach.

Bio:
Mark Guzdial is a Professor in the School of Interactive Computing in the College of Computing at Georgia Institute of Technology. He is a learning scientist who focuses on computing education research. He invented "Media Computation" and has published several books on the use of media as a context for learning computing. Preparing more high school computing teachers is critical to improve access to computing education, so he co-leads an effort to develop electronic books to support teacher learning about computing. He is one of the leads on the NSF-funded Expanding Computing Education Pathways (ECEP) alliance to help US states improve and broaden participation in computing education. He serves on the ACM's Education Council, and is on the editorial boards of the "Journal of the Learning Sciences," "ACM Transactions on Computing Education," and "Communications of the ACM." With his wife and colleague, Barbara Ericson, he received the 2010 ACM Karl V. Karlstrom Outstanding Educator award. He was also the recipient of the 2012 IEEE Computer Society Undergraduate Teaching Award, and is an ACM Distinguished Educator and a Fellow of the ACM.

  • Madhavan Mukund
    Professor and Dean of Studies,
    Chennai Mathematical Institute
    Title: It's All About Programming, Stupid!
Link to the keynote presentation

Abstract:
Computer scientists take great pains to point out that there is more to computer science than programming. While this is undeniable, the implicit message is that lack of programming aptitude and skill is not a hurdle to studying the subject. We claim that this is false: one cannot become an effective computer scientist without being proficient in programming. A true appreciation and understanding of advanced concepts in computer science demands adequate programming background. We will illustrate this point from different perspectives, in particular that of teaching programming side by side with algorithms to students at different levels and from diverse backgrounds.

Bio:
Madhavan Mukund is a Professor and Dean of Studies in Chennai Mathematical Institute. His research interests includes Models for concurrent and distributed systems, Formal verification, Distributed algorithms. He is the President and member of the executive council of Indian Association for Research in Computing Science (IARCS) and Vice President of ACM India Council. He is the National Coordinator of Indian Computing Olympiad and has been the Executive Director of International Olympiad in Informatics from 2011–2014.